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Thursday, September 30, 2010

Fisher Price Bike Recall Causes Total Tizzy at Aussie Jr. Trike World Championships

(Nose Hit News Service-Melboune Austrailia)  Five year old female Junior Recumbent Trike World Champion hopeful, Joelle Bikerski is pissed.  She crossed her arms, furrowed her brow and insisted she’s actually five and a half.  This week Fisher Price, her lightweight high end bike sponsor, recalled the exact bike she planned to ride at this weekend’s World Championships in Australia.  Just days before the big race, she and the other superstars of aerospace thermoplastic tricycle racing in the 4-6 year old category, such as Fabiene Cancellero and Georgette Hincappy, are left scrambling to find another bike their parents will let them ride. 

“I don’t want to bust a nut on that piece of crap,” exclaimed another 5 year old sponsored athlete who stuck his thumb in his mouth and violently shook his head from side to side refusing to be identified.  Australian Police put up barricades and traffic control devices around the local Toys-R-Aussie to keep parents from throwing a complete hissy fit over the recall.  “She’s five years old and at the prime of her career,” exclaimed one outraged parent slash coach slash diaper changer.  “Next year she’ll be over the hill like Brett Favre and Lance Armstrong.”


The sound of pouting, kicking and screaming could be heard all around the athlete’s village.  At press time World Championship organizers were busy trying to make nice-nice with free ice cream and book an emergency concert by rock band The Wiggles.


Dear Dopers, Hoodwinkers, & Rule Skaters:

From the Desk Of:

I just want you all to know that every time I watch a race I fake cheering for you.  You thought when you raced up that mountain that I was standing on the side of the road for hours in the rain pouring my guts out for you.  It was all a sham.  I like ringing cowbells for fun and think my voice sounds cool when it's hoarse.  You totally pedaled faster for nothing!

Remember when you saw me running in my Borat underwear with my Belgian flag and devil’s pitch fork?  Well I burned you.  You thought you witnessed my pure emotion, elation, joy, anger, and sympathy, right?  Well, I wouldn’t waste that on you.  I save that for the things I truly care about.
Did you really think that when I shouted at my television, spilled my Mountain Dew on the carpet, and jumped up on the ottoman that I was truly cheering for you at the Tour?  I was totally bluffing.  I can’t believe you fell for the old pound the sofa and hide my face behind the cushions trick.  That team jersey I bought...it's hanging next to my bidet.  Sorry.  Joke’s on you.  I subscribe to Versus for Bull Riding.
I wish that was true.  However, every time I watch a race, I show my true feelings and emotions for the beautiful sport of cycling.  I show you the true me.  Whether it’s bonking and losing 20 minutes to the leaders or kissing the podium girl on the cheek, I expect I’m seeing the true you. 
Sincerely,
Joe Biker

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

…Is Thinking Of A New Facebook Status Update

Aw man!  I gotta think of a good Facebook status update for this monumental photo.  Sad.  But yes, it was my first thought after I let out a big woot and scared the cats into next Tuesday.  So many good ones went through my head.  I weighed 159 this morning.  I haven’t sunk below 160 in close to 3 years.  I’ve come close.  Last year, 161 I think.  Two years ago I had a rough CX season.  So, I’m a little excited.  It’s been two hours since the weigh in and two hours 15 minutes since my 2nd morning poo and I’m still on the fence about what should be the caption.  Fan us on Facebook and you’ll see the chosen one.

Here’s my Facebook status update contenders to go with the photo:  

(what's on your mind?___________________)

Aw F*** how did I gain 490 pounds?  Wait, it’s upside down, my bad.

Clinched the central division.

AYHSMB

Is nude, all up in your grill and frontin’ bitches.

Is testing his newly invented iPad App…iScale.

Do I win free socks for this?

Saw this, jumped up and down shouting like a lunatic and probably wont see his cats for 2 days.

Does weigh 160 wet.

Does not walk around naked with a camera….really.

Is on the top step of the podium!

Suddenly realized he saved $3000 in potential bike upgrades.

Is headed to the DMV to make a revision on his drivers license.

Is above the Yellow line…saying “Suck It!”

Might be able to fit into his college skinsuit.

Can I exhale now?

Oh great, you’re saying, he’s in the 150’s and braggin’ about his slate bathroom floor, what a dick!

Cut off his lower legs and weighed them or has the “Far Side” comic coffee table book.

Monday, September 27, 2010

A KY Ride Nut For Winter: Kincaid-Claysville-Kincaid

Down here, they get the Sunday paper on Tuesday, one of my buddies joked.  “Claysville Kentucky hello.”  Personally, I pictured Larry King greeting the next caller from Tobacco  Basket, USA not realizing earlier the caller just finished hanging Tobacco to dry in the barn and now settled in for a little T-V.  I rode there yesterday.  Tobacco harvesting season is in full swing in Kentucky.  While some fields were still full of the giant yellowing leaves, others lie bare adjacent to a big black barn packed from floor to ceiling with hanging drying leaves.  While I’m not a fan of smoking, I am a fan of tobacco farming.  With the small black barns and plants with leaves as big as your face, it’s romantic in a way.  I don’t know if it’s true or not, but someone once told me the tobacco barns are black to draw more sunlit heat to the leaves.  While I didn’t smell any yesterday, in just the right conditions late in the summer you can smell the tobacco aroma from the fields and get a tish of a buzz.  Harry, my teammate and longtime Tobacco Basket resident, wrestled unwrapping a Clif Bar outside the Claysville General Store.  “It’s a dying breed,” he said in his soft drawl referring to the store’s genuine dusty boot-carved wooden floorboards which were perfectly unlevel.  Even having to hike around a warshed out bridge (pictured), it was a perfect end of summer ride.

“You know what’s wrong with this ride?”  All together now in staccato, "Not…A…Goddamned…Thing!”  I hate to say it, but the waning daylight doesn’t lie.  It was officially the last ride of the summer.  This blog post is my way of storing a ride nut away for winter.  I’m trying to remember the little details:  Grimes Road- pure Kentucky chip and seal no wider than a bridge of a dozen computer screens, tobacco hanging in little black barns so close to the side of the road you could practically reach inside and rip off a plug, the remarkably friendly farm dogs that just wanted to run with us for a while and drought baked dry creek beds revealing the flat stone underneath.  I like to think of the topography of Kentucky as God’s second draft.  Like he took a map of a flat tree lined beautiful forest, crumpled it up, uncrumpled it, and said, “There…that’s better.”  Then there was that kid on the Huffy.

My friend Tony, who scouted this route south of Kincaid Lake State Park near Falmouth, said the kid, now a young man, was involved in an ATV accident.  As they’d say in rural Kentucky, he’s a little slow.  In a voice that I’ll recall as heartbreaking, he slurred in a drawl, “y’all wanna race?”  My buddy replied, “Naw man, we’re just out for a ride.”  We turned past a house littered with aging old bikes in the front yard.  One of them, a rusted singlespeed with a Schwinn-like curving top tube and an orange panel decal caught our eye, but we didn’t stop and headed down another single lane road toward Claysville.

I don’t know how many hills we climbed, but everyone paid off with a panoramic vista of a creek carved valley.  The ride was a lumpy loop of what seemed like 90% single lane roads which sort of paralleled the Licking River Valley from Kincaid Lake State Park to Claysville touching Pendleton, Harrison and Bracken counties.  Tony brought up his recent trip to North Carolina and Virginia.  While the mountains are nice with their brutally long climbs, heavenly high views and hair raising descents, he reasoned that this was better.  Just off a recent trip to Park City, Utah I knew what he meant.  They payoffs are more frequent in Kentucky, and the price isn’t as high.  In the mountains you might climb up over one or two or three ridges in a long ride, here I literally lost count of the ridgelines, vistas and how many times I said wow.

Before we had left I mentioned the ride to a few friends on FB.  One replied asking, “how far and how fast?”  I had no idea.  Looking back, I seemingly clipped into the ride blind.  Maybe that made it even more enjoyable.  I didn’t care how fast or slow we rode, how much my legs hurt, how long it’d really take, how many miles, or how many climbs there’d be.  I really didn’t know where we were.  Sure I was somewhere around Falmouth, but I didn’t know where the next turn, or climb or sketchy chip and seal descent would be.  I really didn’t care.  I put my trust in two of my Kentucky buddies and like a movie, the ride just played out before my eyes.

Friday, September 24, 2010

Facebook Friday-Riding In Sandals with Flintstone Toes

With a quizzical brow she commented, “You’re riding in sandals?”  While riding my GS45 Super Cruiser (my pet name for my 1992 Specialized Crossroads hybrid equipped with hand-me-down once high-end components like XTR V-brakes), a friend and neighbor was out in front of her house.  I had a few minutes.  Instead of giving her the wave, I stopped to chat.  I brushed off the sandal comment explaining I was headed to Yoga in the Park.  Sandals are easy to kick off for Yoga.  Besides, trying to do Yoga with shoes is as impossible as scuba diving in a tuxedo.  All through my Yoga practice, I couldn’t put my hands to heart center and Namaste it away.  Since then and a second comment from another friend, it’s been niggling me.  What’s wrong with riding in sandals? 

Dear little baby Jesus!  Maybe it’s my freaky toes.  Tell me it’s not my freaky toes.  If you must know these are my piggies.  As you can see, my big toe looks like Fred Flintstone naked.  My pointing toe next door is as tall, thin and twisted as Amy Winehouse on crack and my pinky toe and his neighbor are about the size of large cashews.  Thanks for the freak toes Dad.  I wonder.  Was her comment my friend’s way of saying sandals should be only reserved for people with perfect ducks in a row toes.  Maybe I need a pedi…or a plastic surgeon. 

I’m guessing it’s an old wives tale.  Don’t eat before you swim, don’t feed the Mogwai after midnight and never ever, under any circumstances wear sandals while cycling.  Like the Gremlins movie quote, when exactly is “after midnight” and what exactly is wrong with biking in sandals.  I mean besides having Gremlin toes.  One advantage I’ve found, opposed to wearing skater shoes, is you can more easily wrap your toes around the platform to get more power to the pedals, especially helpful with Cincinnati’s hills.  Secondly, you won’t burn your ankle on the imaginary muffler.

For me, wearing sandals comes down to convenience and minimalism.  That’s what riding a city bike is all about, getting from point A to point B with as little hastle as possible.  When I commute the 5-6 miles to work on the GS45, I don’t put on my team kit.  I don’t wear gloves, bring a water bottle or carry a lock.  I wear jeans, a collared shirt and loafers.  Really the only cycling related thing I wear is a helmet.  My main goal is getting to work without sweating.  Believe it or not, I ride ridiculously slow.  I park the bike in my office, take off my helmet, finger feather the helmet hair away and I’m ready to go.  It’s a beautifully simple thing.  You wear on the bike what you want to be wearing when you get there.  With a city bike it’s not about the ride.  It’s about the destination. 

Still I’m confounded by the sandal comment.  So, I put the question to you.  Now and then we ask our Facebook friends a question and post the comments here on Fridays.  We call it Facebook Friday.  If you’d like to participate, friend us in the right hand column and follow us. 
Today’s Facebook Friday question was:  “Is it an old wives tale?  Is there inherent danger?  What’s the issue with riding in sandals?”




    • David R: Getting beat up by the bike fashion police.



    • Tim W: That's an old wive's tale. Someone (Teva?) made some SPD capable sandals a few years back, IIRC.



    • Jason G: Aside the obvious danger to scraping the shit outta your feet in a crash or even a curb strike, you would to shave your toes and feet too.



    • Mitchell B: Way back when I was a kid, I nearly scraped my toe to the bone when I crashed wearing sandals! Severe toe road rash! Not fun!



    • Mark H: If it feels good, do it.
      Fly that freak flag high.
      Shimano makes a clipless sandal.
      Here is my rule: Sandals are okay; Thongs, no way!



    • Cameron P: Shimano and Lake both sell cycling sandals. I doubt it's too dangerous.

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

A Sandbag Can Be Swept Away

Calling someone a sandbagger in the cycling community is like saying "terrorist" on an airplane, a serious offense or seriously funny.  Nobody likes a sandbagger.  Conversely, nobody appreciates being called a sandbagger.  Certainly nobody likes people who call other people sandbaggers, unless you’re totally “besties forever” joking and ribbing over a few beers while toasting a friend or teammate’s stellar performance.  This week a blog called Ohio Sandbagger shouted the “s” word from seat 43-B in the back row.  At first it was funny.  As it settled in, we found out it’s the equivalent of calling a baby ugly to the mother’s face.  Like driving past a porn store on the freeway, we quickly looked away.  It felt wrong.

Traditionally, a sandbag holds back water in a flood, something we’re no strangers to in the Ohio River Valley.  Simply stated, a sandbag prevents the water from flowing to the other side.  A bike racing sandbagger is no different.  True to definition, it stays steadfast, preventing other racers from achieving success or moving up into the next category.  Simple as a straightaway dismount right?  Not so quick speedy, and keep in mind sandbags are temporary.

Also consider some bodies of water physically and figuratively cannot be sandbagged, like the toilet in the Biggest Loser green room.  An elite race is the ocean.  Since it is the ultimate destination for all water, sandbagging is only possible in bodies of water smaller than it.  If you’re looking to out a sandbagger, you’re not going to find one in the Bearing Straight.  It’s best to look in a tributary like Williamstown Lake, the category 3 Ohio River, Duck Creek or the overflow from the port-o-lets at Boon Dock CX Park USA.

While there may be sandbagging going on in the OVCX, thou shalt not use the “S” word in vain.  There’s more than lap times, podium steps and upgrade points to consider.  Like the orange community water bottle jug at cross practice, the water is deep and murky.  There are undercurrents like newborn babies and long hours at work that might keep someone who was successful in the lower category in the past from moving up to the next category tomorrow.  We’re all people with jobs, families, funerals and weddings.  I know crossers that are on-call pilots and late night musicians.  Some of us might even like to do crazy things in our underwear Saturday at midnight.  All of that…is none of your business. 

Then there’s the joy of being on the podium itself.  I’ve been there on occasion, never on the top step in a cyclocross race, but I’ve flanked the sides.  It’s more wonderful than fresh white bar tape and a matching saddle.  With the flashes popping in your eyes, photos being uploaded to your FB wall and big hoots and hugs from your teammates and best buds, it’s something to be enjoyed and celebrated.  It’s as big of a part of racing as the carpool coffee stop.  One thing’s for certain, more of us need to head to the podium to cheer, rather than packing up the car and leaving the race venue in a huff.

Sandbagging is not even about completely trouncing the competition till they’re wheezing like a donkey while crying for mama between bouts of the pukes.  Someone who stomps the Cat 4 or Cat 3 race with lap times that’d put them in the top 15 of an elite race should first be heralded as an up and coming fast S.O.B., not a sandbagger.  Pat ‘em on the back.  Well done.  There are a few folks racing OVCX that I’ve seen do just that.  It’s been amazing to watch and even more fun to cheer, especially when you hear a local did well at Nationals.  That’s called winning.  That’s called training hard and rising to the top.  That’s what most of us are racing for in the first place.  When you get to the top it should be enjoyed, otherwise it’s like having a birthday with no cake. 

While we all initially thumbed our noses at USA Cycling for coming up with categories for our beloved once grass roots sport, the guidelines for upgrading from one category to the next are clear and work quite well.  In the case of having a baby, getting that big promotion with more hours, or having to take care of elderly parents…you can even downgrade.  The great thing about it all is your local USA Cycling representative is likely your Facebook friend.  Without looking at your results on the computer, they probably know you better than you think.  Now that’s grass roots.

Besides, right before our Oakley’s the landscape of cyclocross is changing.  Just a few years ago, we marked our courses with flags and strategically placed water bottles.  We peed in the woods.  All the fields combined may have totaled 35 people.  (photo: Harbin Park 1997) This past weeked at the King’s CX there were reported to be 50 juniors and something crazy like 500 racers.  Already those youngsters are starting to work their way up, busting their humps, racing two or three or four races in a weekend.  No amount of sandbagging is going to hold their flood back.  Nature and youth will take it’s course.

There’s really no need to call out sandbaggers, like there’s no reason to cast judgement on one’s appearance.  There’s always more to the story than the numbers show.  As our new juniors and this year's riders committed to training will prove, some bodies of water may seem impassable, but a sandbag can be moved.  If not, eventually all sandbags deteriorate in the water.  Hup hup buttercup.

Monday, September 20, 2010

Forget the Coach, Hire a Psychiatrist

There are so many adages of cycling.  The moment you upgrade for the sake of having something new, something old will fail.  Let the words, “I’ve never rolled a tubular,” escape your word-hole and you better start gluing tonight.  Yesterday at King’s CX, the sayings came true, including: “Practice riding through the pit and you’re bound for a return trip.”  This may sound crazy but, I think it all had something to do with the new gloves and set of Hudz I bought recently.  Let me explain my irrational train of thought, because certainly if you ride bikes this will all make perfect sense.

Cyclocross makes one so neurotic that nothing can be left for chance.  This is precisely why 8 out of 10 cyclocrossers walk around like Rainman on race day morning and, no doubt, buy their underwear at K-mart Cincinnati.  Or, it could be accidental inhalation of tubular glue.  Seriously, there are two types of people that sport a full beard and knee-high argyle socks: deranged glue sniffing people that live under the freeway overpass and cyclocrossers.  It’s no surprise.  

Cyclocross is insanely confounding.  It’s a double edged sword of fate versus wisdom.  The reason is in cyclocross, you’re the only one to blame.  We take great pains in preparation, to lessen the chances of stupidity, to learn from those that have come before us, and to not tempt fate.  If all else fails and the budget allows, in a perfect world we hire someone to blame, such as a coach.

A Facebook friend commented that I looked so smooth and calculated in the pits changing my wheel during the race.  That’s because I had practiced it, like any coach would advise.  You can’t be fast in the pits, if you don’t practice it.  So on a warm up lap, 10 to 20 meters before entry, I upshifting into the highest gear like I was preparing for a rear wheel change, zipped into the pit, located my wheels, downshifted and exited.  However, in making preparation, I tempted fate.  Had I NOT practiced it, I would never have rolled my tire in the first place.  You following me camera guy?  Bikefucious say: be wise and do not tempt fate. 


As much as I’d like to blame it on tempting fate, my preparation surely must have been flawed.  I’m the only one to blame right?  Somewhere my wisdom failed me.   Herein is where the neurosis of self depreciation and a stay in the psycho ward on top floor of the local hospital begins.  The question undoubtedly is NOT why did my tubular roll off the rim, but what in great Belgium did I do wrong that caused my tubular to roll of the rim? 

Here’s why.  I broke cyclocross rules #397 and 842.  If you’ve forgotten:

Cyclocross Rule #397: Don’t be a cheap wad lazy-ass and always reglue your tires at the beginning of every season. 

Cyclocross Rule #842:Never splurge on needless upgrades until the basics have been covered.

Remember that set of Hudz and pair of gloves?  They cost about fifty bucks, coincidentally exactly the same amount of money the shop charges to glue up tubular tires.  Instead I opted for the pretty blue Hudz and year-old glue on my tubies.  Excuse me while I put on my helmet, curl up in a fetal position and rock under the freeway overpass.

Friday, September 17, 2010

Video: How I Spent My Summer MTB Vacation in Park City

I had no idea until I climbed nearly 2000 feet up the Spiro Trail in Park City Utah on Saturday, September 11th, the Mid-Mountain Marathon would crowd the Mid-Mountain trail from Deer Valley to the Canyons Resort.  I planned on riding Mid-Mountain from the Spiro to the Canyons.  It is an "epic" ride, an IMBA epic in fact, a ride I kept in the back of my head throughout Cincinnati's hot and muggy summer.  I was bummed...for a few seconds.


When I got to the intersection of the Spiro and Mid-Mountain at 8:45am with frost on the ground and my breath visible in the air, I realized there was no way I could share the trail with the 100 or so runners.  I asked a cyclist from White Pine Outfitters, the best bike shop in PC in my opinion who was on the mountain side cheering for his running wife, what I should do.  He was riding a sweet XTR equipped Cannondale Scalpel.  Certainly he knew how to resurrect my ride.  


He recommended I continue up the mountain on the Powerline Trail to pretty little Shadow Lake, then take the flowing Keystone trail to Apex to the Steps, where I could intersect the Mid-Mountain again and head toward Deer Valley.  Aside from the nut buster baby head rock strewn climb up Powerline to 9000+ feet (where his advice to "just relax and climb" was dead-on), it did not disappoint.  With the vistas and sweet flowing trail of Keystone and the switchbacks of Apex and The Steps I couldn't help but pull out the cell-phone camera and capture the scenery.  On the way back to Main Street, I tossed in a Park City favorite, the Tour Des Suds as my descent from 8000 feet.  


Here's my video diary of the day.

Thursday, September 16, 2010

Psycho: OVCX Masked Poochnosticator Picks Kings CX Podiums

Who'll lift their leg on the podium?  Who'll be a turd in the grass?  The results are in from "Psycho," the OVCX Masked Poochnosticator.  

At Harbin Park in Fairfield Wednesday night, and at practices all around the Ohio Valley, you may have seen a dog nearby.  Ah ha!  Well then, you've seen a stringer for Psycho.  And, they've seen you.  Maybe your chamois got sniffed, the salt crust on your shin licked, or you got a howl of disapproval casing a barrier or loosing the front tire on a tight corner.  The  animal kingdom has been watching you ride and reported back to Psycho.  

Last night, The Best Bike Blog Ever put the Bike Reg confirmed rider sheet in Psycho's Den.  If he peed on your name, Psycho picks you to lead the pack at OVCX #1 at King's this Sunday.  If not...you could be a turd in the grass.

Good Luck.  (note: Psycho ate the run down sheets of the Juniors, Tandum and other races, so there's no poochnosticating for those divisions...bad dog!)




Sunday - Men Cat 1/2/3 - Masters 35+/45+
Brian    
Andriot    
Bicycle Sport Inc.    
Joe    
Bellante    
BioWheels/Reece-Campbell Racing    
Scott    
Bond    
Speedway Wheelmen    
Thomas    
Brockman    
Louisville Firefighters    
David    
Coar    
DRT Consulting    
Erik    
Fagerberg    
Papa John's Racing Team    
Micah    
Fritzinger    
Schellers Fitness & Cycling    
John    
Gatch    
Huntington Bank / Specialized    
Mitch    
Graham    
BioWheels/Reece-Campbell Racing    
Corey    
Green    
    
Chris    
Grisvard    
new hampshire cycling club    
Keith    
Lucas    
Schellers Racing Team    
Rick    
Lyons    
rogue racing    
John    
Mandrola    
Papa Johns Racing Team    
John    
May, Sr    
Barbasol/Rapid Transit    
Michael    
McShane    
    
Andrew    
Messer    
DRT Racing pb Revolution Bike & Bean    
Todd    
Nix    
Ohio Valley Velo    
Phil    
Noble    
BioWheels/Reece-Campbell Racing    
Bruce    
Pisarek    
COBC National Engineering    
Frederick    
Rose    
BikeReg.com    
      Sunday - Men Cat 1/2/3 - Masters 35+/45+ Entries: 21
Sunday - Men Cat 1/2/3 - Open
Christopher    
Bogedin    
Bob's Red Mill p/b Focus Bikes    
Christopher    
Chartier    
Alderfer Bergen    
Edwin    
Colvin    
Trek/BGI Racing    
Zachary    
Edwards    
DRT Racing    
Johnathan    
Freter    
Pro Chain cycling/ Team Turner    
Scott    
Gartman    
Team Lake Effect    
Erik    
Hamilton    
    
Josh    
Johnson    
DRT Racing    
Jason    
Karew    
Bishops Bicycles    
Rob    
Kendall    
Bob's Red Mill    
Mike    
Kennedy    
Bob's Red Mill    
Mason    
Morgan    
Cap City Cross    
Geffrey    
Moy    
    
Travis    
Mullen    
29er Crew    
Chris    
Nevitt    
Bob's Red Mill    
Joshua    
Prater    
Speedway Wheelmen    
John    
Proppe    
Lake Effect Racing    
Adam    
Rodkey    
Speedway Wheelmen    
Katsuhiro    
Tanda    
Team Athens / KT Prototype    
Jacob    
Virostko    
Shamrock/Biowheels Racing    
Matthew    
Weeks    
Team Lake Effect/Bike Authority    
Kyle    
Wingler    
alan north america    
      Sunday - Men Cat 1/2/3 - Open Entries: 22
Sunday - Men Cat 3 - Masters 35+
David    
Aukerman    
Indiana Hand Center    
Joern    
Brockhaus    
Michelob Ultra Cycling    
Doug    
Carraway    
Ohio Orthopedic/Moro Cycling    
Evan    
Clark    
    
Brian    
Collier    
BioWheels Racing    
Jeff    
Cyrus    
CORA-Cincinnati Off-Road Alliance    
Mark    
Farmer    
Ohio Orthopedic Center of Excellence/Moro Cycling    
Butch    
Farrell    
Rogue Racing Project    
Gregory    
Fasig    
Zephyr / Cycle Sport    
Steven    
Gers    
BioWheels/Reece-Campbell Racing    
Corey    
Green    
    
David    
Groen    
National Engineering    
Jerry    
Hayes Ii    
Queen City Wheels    
Scot    
Herrmann    
team DAYTON    
Peter    
Hills    
Michelob Ultra Cycling    
Nate    
Loman    
Team Lake Effect/Hammer Nutrition    
Rick    
Maier    
Team Dayton    
Nathan    
Mirus    
BioWheels Cincy    
Scott    
Murschel    
Biowheels Race Team    
Layne    
Peters    
Team Awesome    
Dave    
Placke    
Team OPLP    
Rodney    
Roof    
ZWS/Cyclesport    
Jeff    
Schoeny    
michelob ultra    
Brian    
Segal    
Rogue Racing Project    
Matt    
Stierwalt    
Rogue Racing Project    
James    
Turner    
Team IPRO    
Christoph    
Uhlenbruch    
Commonwealth Eye Surgery    
Duane    
Walker    
BikeClicks.com/Team Louisville    
      Sunday - Men Cat 3 - Masters 35+ Entries: 28
Sunday - Men Cat 3 - Masters 45+
Lars    
Andersen    
    
Lou    
Beckmeyer    
7 Hills Racing    
Scott    
Belcher    
7 Hills Racing    
Brian    
Blackwell    
Rogue Racing Project    
Jeffrey    
Chambers    
Schellers Racing Team    
Fraser    
Cunningham    
Zephyr Wheel Sports    
Chip    
Ellison    
QCW/Pearl Izumi    
Chris    
Grisvard    
new hampshire cycling club    
Doug    
Hamilton    
BioWheels/Reece-Campbell Racing    
John    
Harris    
Rogue Racing Project    
David    
Hart    
ZWS Cyclesport    
Jim    
Havey    
Commonwealth Eye Surgery / Pedal the Planet    
David    
Lane    
Main Street Velo    
Kay    
Ohta    
    
Mike    
Otting    
7hills racing    
Michael    
Seiler    
Rogue Racing Project    
Kenny    
Sipes    
CKW Racing    
Harry    
Wicks    
Biowheels/Reese- Campbell Racing    
Scott    
Young    
Tri Tech    
      Sunday - Men Cat 3 - Masters 45+ Entries: 19
Sunday - Men Cat 3 - Open
Tim    
Beberniss    
One Call Now    
Andrew    
Beckman    
Bob's Red Mill    
James    
Billiter    
BioWheels/Reese-Campbell Racing    
Andrew    
Boneff    
    
Jeremy    
Burroughs    
Queen City Wheels    
Michael    
Chewning    
Team Hungry!    
Joe    
Czerwonka    
Bob's Red Mill p/b Focus Bikes    
Samuel    
Dobrozsi    
Prochain / Team Turner    
Spencer    
Hackett    
B1 Bicycles    
Luke    
Haley    
Red Zone Cycling    
Michael    
Jernigan    
CAT Racing / Pittsburgh Elite Velo    
Chauncey    
Joyce    
7 Hills Racing    
Alex    
Kerman    
One Call Now    
Ryan    
Kiel    
Lilly - Gray Goat Cycling    
Dan    
Lach    
Cyclesport/Zephyr Wheel Sport    
Nicholas    
Leonard    
Ohio Valley Velo    
John    
Markstein    
Team Awesome / Jeni's    
Andrew    
Millard    
ZWS/CycleSport    
Jason    
Monk    
Main Street Velo    
Jason    
Mott    
BioWheels/Reece-Campbell Racing    
Dave    
Mundy    
Team Dayton Michelob Ultra Cycling    
Joseph    
Nalley    
BikeClicks / Team Louisville    
Kerry    
Nordstrom    
Team Hungry!!1    
Brad    
Oakley    
Pedal the Planet/Commonwealth Eye Surgery    
Daniel    
Ott    
Darkhorse Racing    
Scott    
Pardi    
Team Hungry!!    
Jaden    
Sempsrott    
BioWheels/Reece-Campbell Racing    
Gregg    
Shanefelt    
ZWS/cyclesport    
William    
Sherman    
Shamrock Cycles    
Tim    
Sholl    
Ohio Orthopedic Center of Excellence/ Moro Cycling    
Ray    
Smith    
Humana/Cycler's Cafe    
Nick    
Tinsler    
Darkhorse Racing    
Kevin    
Vanwert    
Zephyr Wheel Sports    
      Sunday - Men Cat 3 - Open Entries: 33
Sunday - Men Cat 4 - Masters 35+
Christian    
Ambjorn    
Reser Fusion Velo Experience    
Aaron    
Bovalino    
Beaver Valley Velo    
Bob    
Butsch    
Zephyr Wheel Sports    
Chris    
Carville    
biowheels racing    
Andrew    
Cover    
    
David    
Garlow    
    
Jason    
Garneret    
CORA-Cincinnati Off-Road Alliance    
Kirk    
Grynwald    
Rogue Racing Project    
Rick    
Hoeting    
Queen City Wheels    
Bryan    
Horton    
Reser Fusion Velo Experience    
Jason    
Justi    
Beaver Valley Velo    
Larry    
Long    
Reser Fusion Velo Experience    
Scott    
Lyle    
Zephyr Wheel Sports    
Richard    
McCreary    
Michelob Ultra Cycling Team    
Rick    
McKenzie    
Gears 4 Beers    
Pope    
Mobley    
Rogue Racing Project    
Tom    
Mulpagano    
Shamrock Cycles    
Tim    
Odonnell    
Shamrock Cycles    
Scott    
Perry    
Speedway Wheelmen    
Larry    
Pethick    
BikeClicks/Team Louisville    
John    
Petrov    
Queen City Wheels    
Luther    
Prater    
Speedway Wheelmen    
Robert    
Prewitt    
QCW    
Eric    
Puryear    
Team Hungry!    
Joseph    
Rippe    
Team Dayton/Michelob Ultra Cycling    
Doug    
Roemer    
Rogue Racing Project - 502    
Chip (otto)    
Schug    
Team WebCyclery.com    
Brian    
Segal    
Rogue Racing Project    
Bo    
Sherman    
Michelob Ultra Cycling    
Shawn    
Sichak    
Cycle Sport    
Duncan    
Spillman    
    
Jon    
Timmons    
    
Tim    
Vincent    
na    
Mark    
Whitt    
Team Dayton    
      Sunday - Men Cat 4 - Masters 35+ Entries: 34
Sunday - Men Cat 4 - Masters 45+
Don    
Bill    
Michelob Ultra    
Lance    
Brown    
Darkhorse Racing    
Yngvar    
Brynildssen    
Speedway Wheelmen    
Paul    
Colavincenzo    
Team Dayton    
John    
Downey    
Gears4Beers    
D.a.    
Fleischer    
Gears 4 Beers    
Mike    
Frey    
    
Barry    
Hughes    
    
Todd    
King    
    
Janusz    
Kossek    
    
Peter    
Lytle    
Gears 4 Beers    
Mark    
McKenney    
7 Hills Racing    
Dave    
Nissen    
QCW    
John    
Rademacher    
Queen City Wheels    
Benjamin    
Ross    
7 Hills Racing Inc    
Jeffrey    
Schepper    
Speedway Wheelmen    
Eric    
Schumacher    
7 Hills Racing    
Kelly    
Sullivan    
bishops bicycles    
Dell    
Williamson    
Queen City Wheels    
      Sunday - Men Cat 4 - Masters 45+ Entries: 19
Sunday - Men Cat 4 - Open
Will    
Bain    
BikeClicks/Team Louisville    
Chris    
Blanchard    
Miami University    
Charles    
Bossart    
    
Zach    
Cahill    
Team Hungry    
Darryn    
Fessel    
7 Hills Racing    
Kurtis    
Fraley    
Ohio Orthopedic/ Moro Cycling    
Mike    
Frankeberger    
Cycler's Cafe    
Ben    
Glover    
Red Zone Cycling    
Gavin    
Haley    
Red Zone Cycling    
Marion    
Hambrick    
Rogue Racing Project    
Matt    
Harbaugh    
Queen City Wheels    
Patrick    
Lach    
    
Tyler    
Lach    
Cyclesport/Zephyr Wheel Sport    
Nate    
Maxson    
Darkhorse Racing    
Ian    
McShane    
Red Zone Cycling    
Jared    
Preston    
    
David    
Rohrer    
Team Athens    
Brian    
Schultz    
Ohio Orthopedic/Moro Cycling    
Cooper    
Simon    
Red Zone Cycling    
Brian    
Sparkman    
    
Michael    
Starr    
Team Hungry!    
Alex    
Steinker    
Team Hungry    
Adam    
Stevens    
    
Thomas    
Waggener    
main street velo    
Jamie    
Williamson    
QCW    
Andrew    
Wright    
    
      Sunday - Men Cat 4 - Open Entries: 26
Sunday - One Day License Fee
Chris    
Blanchard    
Miami University    
Barry    
Hughes    
    
Todd    
King    
    
Dave    
Placke    
Team OPLP    
Tim    
Vincent    
na    

Sunday - Women Cat 1/2/3
Nicole    
Borem    
DRT Racing    
Melissa    
Corliss    
Team Dayton Michelob Ultra Cycling    
Annajean    
Dallaire    
Alderfer Bergen    
Bridget    
Donovan    
Trek Store Cincinnati/ Seven Cycles    
Nancy    
Henderson    
    
Erika    
Howard    
Michelob Ultra Cycling    
Gerry    
Schulze    
BioWheels/Reece-Campbell Racing    
Bridget    
Sempsrott    
BioWheels/Reece-Campbell Racing    
Kiersta    
Tucker    
Team Wood n Wave    
Amanda    
Virostko    
Shamrock Cycles/Biowheels Racing    
      Sunday - Women Cat 1/2/3 Entries: 10
Sunday - Women Cat 3/4 - Masters 35+
Ginger    
Ballard    
TEAM Awesome/Jeni's IceCream    
Mary    
Bill    
Michelob Ultra    
Heather    
Farrell    
CORA    
Claudia    
Fritzinger    
Schellers Fitness & Cycling    
Karen    
Hamilton    
BioWheels/Reece-Campbell Racing    
Geanie    
Helfrich    
Michelob Ultra    
Tiffanie    
Hills    
Michelob Ultra Cycling    
Jenny    
Lytle    
G4B    
Staci    
Mandrola    
Papa Johns Racing Team    
Karin    
Reed    
Team Dayton    
      Sunday - Women Cat 3/4 - Masters 35+ Entries: 10
Sunday - Women Cat 3/4 - Open
Elizabeth    
Cobb    
BikeReg.com    
Shanna    
Duffy    
Michelob Ultra    
Kate    
Graham    
Biowheels-Reece Campbell    
Malissa    
Petrov    
ZWS Cyclesport    
Jayne    
Prater    
    
Lindsay    
Rodkey    
Velo Bella    
Chienhuei (janet)    
Sherman    
Sherman Racing    
Sarah    
Sherman    
Michelob Ultra Cycling    
Sarah    
Swallow    
    
Julie    
Wilson    
team DAYTON